32 Attacking Drills

How is your blocking? The crossover is better for when you have to travel far to get in position to block because you can get there faster than shuffling. In , the game was changed from requiring 21 points to win to a smaller 15 points to win. If you'd like to share this page on your social accounts, you can use the buttons below. Get our best tips delivered to your inbox!

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Get active this summer and have fun on the sand volleyball courts. It's a great workout and very social, but can be intimidating for newcomers. Here are five basics to know before you swagger up to a net:. Sand is tough to play in. You'll be slower, you'll tire faster and your vertical jump will be reduced to millimeters. To survive, economize your energy. Take small steps - you lose power on long strides.

Beach volleyball is played barefoot, so when the sand gets hot, dig your feet a few inches under the top layers to cool them off. Drink lots of water to stay hydrated.

The good news is sand is forgiving on your joints, so you can enjoy the game well into your golden years. Be sure to research which of your local beaches have permanent nets so you don't have to worry about bringing any equipment besides a ball. Beach volleyballs are softer, lighter and a bit bigger than indoor balls and beach courts are smaller than indoor courts.

Men's nets are 7. If you are a group of men playing on a women's net or vice versa, don't be surprised if you get kicked off when the beach gets busy. It's good etiquette to play on the appropriate net height and if you have a co-ed group, you should play on a men's net. If you have a group, it's best to arrive at the beach early to claim a net without waiting for one to open up. If you show up with only a partner, you can "challenge on" to a court: List your event Need to give your event a boost?

Team Hitting Drills Teams that don't hit effectively won't succeed on the court. Hitter Coverage Drill Digging a blocked ball is one of the most challenging parts of a volleyball match. Attacker Vision Training It's important for attackers to recognize a block when on the offensive. Volleyball Player's Guide to Finger Taping Whether you're a hitter or a blocker, you're going to do some damage to your fingernails.

Are you sure you want to delete this family member? Find activities close to home. Activities near you will have this indicator. Activities near you will have this indicator Within 2 Miles. To save your home and search preferences Join Active or Sign In. The ball is usually played with the hands or arms, but players can legally strike or push short contact the ball with any part of the body.

A number of consistent techniques have evolved in volleyball, including spiking and blocking because these plays are made above the top of the net, the vertical jump is an athletic skill emphasized in the sport as well as passing , setting , and specialized player positions and offensive and defensive structures. Morgan , a YMCA physical education director, created a new game called Mintonette , a name derived from the game of badminton , [4] as a pastime to be played preferably indoors and by any number of players.

The game took some of its characteristics from other sports such as tennis and handball. Mintonette was designed to be an indoor sport, less rough than basketball, for older members of the YMCA, while still requiring a bit of athletic effort.

A match was composed of nine innings with three serves for each team in each inning, and no limit to the number of ball contacts for each team before sending the ball to the opponents' court. In case of a serving error, a second try was allowed. Hitting the ball into the net was considered a foul with loss of the point or a side-out —except in the case of the first-try serve.

After an observer, Alfred Halstead, noticed the volleying nature of the game at its first exhibition match in , played at the International YMCA Training School now called Springfield College , the game quickly became known as volleyball it was originally spelled as two words: The first official ball used in volleyball is disputed; some sources say Spalding created the first official ball in , while others claim it was created in In , the game was changed from requiring 21 points to win to a smaller 15 points to win.

In , about 16, volleyballs were distributed by the American Expeditionary Forces to their troops and allies , which sparked the growth of volleyball in new countries. The first country outside the United States to adopt volleyball was Canada in Beach volleyball , a variation of the game played on sand and with only two players per team, became a FIVB-endorsed variation in and was added to the Olympic program at the Summer Olympics.

Nudists were early adopters of the game with regular organized play in clubs as early as the late s. Volleyball has been part of the Summer Olympics program for both men and women consistently since This "3 meter" or "foot" line divides the court into "back row" and "front row" areas also back court and front court. After a team gains the serve also known as siding out , its members must rotate in a clockwise direction, with the player previously in area "2" moving to area "1" and so on, with the player from area "1" moving to area "6".

The team courts are surrounded by an area called the free zone which is a minimum of 3 meters wide and which the players may enter and play within after the service of the ball. If a ball comes in contact with the line, the ball is considered to be "in". An antenna is placed on each side of the net perpendicular to the sideline and is a vertical extension of the side boundary of the court.

A ball passing over the net must pass completely between the antennae or their theoretical extensions to the ceiling without contacting them. Each team consists of six players. A player from the serving team throws the ball into the air and attempts to hit the ball so it passes over the net on a course such that it will land in the opposing team's court the serve. The team on defense attempts to prevent the attacker from directing the ball into their court: After a successful dig, the team transitions to offense.

The game continues in this manner, rallying back and forth, until the ball touches the court within the boundaries or until an error is made. Players may travel well outside the court to play a ball that has gone over a sideline or end-line in the air. Other common errors include a player touching the ball twice in succession, a player "catching" the ball, a player touching the net while attempting to play the ball, or a player penetrating under the net into the opponent's court.

There are a large number of other errors specified in the rules, although most of them are infrequent occurrences. These errors include back-row or libero players spiking the ball or blocking back-row players may spike the ball if they jump from behind the attack line , players not being in the correct position when the ball is served, attacking the serve in the front court and above the height of the net, using another player as a source of support to reach the ball, stepping over the back boundary line when serving, taking more than 8 seconds to serve, [18] or playing the ball when it is above the opponent's court.

When the ball contacts the floor within the court boundaries or an error is made, the team that did not make the error is awarded a point, whether they served the ball or not.

If the ball hits the line, the ball is counted as in. The team that won the point serves for the next point. If the team that won the point served in the previous point, the same player serves again. If the team that won the point did not serve the previous point, the players of the serving team rotate their position on the court in a clockwise manner. The game continues, with the first team to score 25 points by a two-point margin awarded the set.

Matches are best-of-five sets and the fifth set, if necessary, is usually played to 15 points. Scoring differs between leagues, tournaments, and levels; high schools sometimes play best-of-three to 25; in the NCAA matches are played best-of-five to 25 as of the season. Before , points could be scored only when a team had the serve side-out scoring and all sets went up to only 15 points. The FIVB changed the rules in with the changes being compulsory in to use the current scoring system formerly known as rally point system , primarily to make the length of the match more predictable and to make the game more spectator- and television-friendly.

Rally point scoring debuted in , [20] and games were played to 30 points through For the season, games were renamed "sets" and reduced to 25 points to win. Most high schools in the U. The libero player was introduced internationally in , [25] and made its debut for NCAA competition in When the ball is not in play, the libero can replace any back-row player, without prior notice to the officials.

This replacement does not count against the substitution limit each team is allowed per set, although the libero may be replaced only by the player whom he or she replaced. The libero may function as a setter only under certain restrictions. An underhand pass is allowed from any part of the court. The libero is, generally, the most skilled defensive player on the team.

There is also a libero tracking sheet, where the referees or officiating team must keep track of whom the libero subs in and out for. There may only be one libero per set game , although there may be a different libero in the beginning of any new set game. Furthermore, a libero is not allowed to serve, according to international rules, with the exception of the NCAA women's volleyball games, where a rule change allows the libero to serve, but only in a specific rotation.

That is, the libero can only serve for one person, not for all of the people for whom she goes in. That rule change was also applied to high school and junior high play soon after. Other rule changes enacted in include allowing serves in which the ball touches the net, as long as it goes over the net into the opponents' court. Also, the service area was expanded to allow players to serve from anywhere behind the end line but still within the theoretical extension of the sidelines.

Other changes were made to lighten up calls on faults for carries and double-touches, such as allowing multiple contacts by a single player "double-hits" on a team's first contact provided that they are a part of a single play on the ball. In , the NCAA changed the minimum number of points needed to win any of the first four sets from 30 to 25 for women's volleyball men's volleyball remained at 30 for another 3 years, switching to 25 in If a fifth deciding set is reached, the minimum required score remains at In addition, the word "game" is now referred to as "set".

Changes in rules have been studied and announced by the FIVB in recent years, and they have released the updated rules in Competitive teams master six basic skills: A player stands behind the inline and serves the ball, in an attempt to drive it into the opponent's court. The main objective is to make it land inside the court; it is also desirable to set the ball's direction, speed and acceleration so that it becomes difficult for the receiver to handle it properly.

Also called reception, the pass is the attempt by a team to properly handle the opponent's serve, or any form of attack. Proper handling includes not only preventing the ball from touching the court, but also making it reach the position where the setter is standing quickly and precisely. The skill of passing involves fundamentally two specific techniques: The set is usually the second contact that a team makes with the ball.

As with passing, one may distinguish between an overhand and a bump set. Since the former allows for more control over the speed and direction of the ball, the bump is used only when the ball is so low it cannot be properly handled with fingertips, or in beach volleyball where rules regulating overhand setting are more stringent. In the case of a set, one also speaks of a front or back set, meaning whether the ball is passed in the direction the setter is facing or behind the setter.

There is also a jump set that is used when the ball is too close to the net. In this case the setter usually jumps off his or her right foot straight up to avoid going into the net. Sometimes a setter refrains from raising the ball for a teammate to perform an attack and tries to play it directly onto the opponent's court.

This movement is called a "dump". The most common dumps are to 'throw' the ball behind the setter or in front of the setter to zones 2 and 4. More experienced setters toss the ball into the deep corners or spike the ball on the second hit.